angell1_2Angell Woods - exceptional fauna and flora
Nature lovers, keep your eyes peeled for the many rare floristic species you might see in Angell Woods, such as two rare species of trees, the Northern hackberry and the black maple, as well as a shrub, the American bladdernut. Because of its vast area and tall trees, Angell Woods is a suitable habitat for several wildlife species which include the brown snake, an endangered species, and numerous birds of prey.

Covering 80 hectares, these remarkable woods consist mainly of mature deciduous trees, some of which are over a hundred years old. Dear to the hearts of area residents and defended by several interest groups, Angel Woods has deep roots within the community.

The City of Beaconsfield is proud to be associated with the following partners for the preservation of Angell Woods:

apaw

The Association for the protection of Angell Woods is a non-profit volunteer organization created to protect and promote the responsible use of Angell Woods.

Website: www.apaw.ca

 greenlogo_100

The mission of this non-profit association of groups and individuals is to promote the preservation, protection and rehabilitation of the environment as well as the rational use of green and blue spaces.

Website: www.greencoalitionverte.ca

ducks_unlimited_100

Ducks Unlimited is the world's leader in wetlands and waterfowl conservation.

Website: www.ducks.ca

logo_ville_mtl

Angell Woods is located in citiesof Beaconsfield and Kirkland. It is delimited to the south by Highway 20, to the north by Highway 40, to the east by a residential district and a former golf course and to the west, by an industrial park. Find out more about the environmental features of Angell Woods.

Consult the press release entitled : Commendable Teamwork to save Angell Woods

Angell Woods information sheet

angell-carte_2A forest ecosystem of great ecological value
Angell Woods is located in the cities of Beaconsfield and Kirkland. It is delimited to the south by Highway 20, to the north by Highway 40, to the east by a residential district and a former golf course and to the west, by an industrial park.

Covering approximately 80 ha., it consists mainly of mature deciduous tree populations, some of which are centuries old.

The trees in these old forest populations can measure up to 1 meter in diameter at breast height. The woods' mature populations are mainly a sugar maple grove with butternut hickory and a red ash plantation.

micoulier_2The sugar maple grove with hickory grows in the well drained limestone sites while the red ash plantation is found in the depression at the north end of the woods, where it creates a swamp (forest popul ation flooded in the spring), as well as in the limestone area.

The other forest populations  consist of wooded fallows and young populations, in which red ash dominates, that have taken over what was previously farmland. They occupy the west and south sections of the woods. A small cedar grove covering 0.4 hectares in the oldest part of the woods (the northeast) is the only conifer population. Wild birds such as raptors possibly use this environment as a shelter in winter. Along the woods' perimeter, herbaceous fallows serve as buffer zones for this forest ecosystem.

The sugar maple groves with bitternut hickory are forest populations typical of Greater Montreal's climaxic domain and have been declared exceptional forest ecosystems (EFE) by the Quebec Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR).

staphylier_2Many rare floristic species are found in the woods, including two species of trees, the Northern hackberry and the black maple, as well as a shrub, the American bladdernut. Other interesting species of trees encountered are the bitternut hickory, the shagbark hickory, the iron wood, the American basswood, the red oak and the bur oak.

The brown snake, a species likely to be listed as threatened or endangered, may be present along the perimeter of Angell Woods. These woods are a suitable habitat for birds of prey (nest building, migrating and wintering) because of their vast area and tall trees. These birds use the fallow lands along the woods' perimeter as feeding grounds.

Following a brief tour of the site in February 2003, it was confirmed that birds of prey nest in the woods' mature populations. Ten or so aeries built by birds of prey (platforms made up of branches) were seen, most of them in the western part of the wooded swamps near the fallow lands. The species most likely to reproduce in this environment are the red tail hawk, the red-shouldered hawk, Cooper's hawk, the sharp-shinned hawk, the horned owl, the Eastern screech owl, the Northern harrier and the American kestrel.

Among these species, Cooper's hawk and the red-shouldered hawk are likely to be put on the list of threatened or endangered species. These two species of raptors nest in the L'Anse-à-l'Orme nature park located 1 kilometre north of Angell Woods.