• The first minutes of the City of Beaconsfield dates from July 1, 1910.
  • Meetings are held at the hall of the schoolhouse Beaurepaire. This room is rented by the City Council and is located in the Upper River Range.
  • The first employee of the City of Beaconsfield is JLVital Mallette, secretary-treasurer's salary is $ 15.00 per month.
  • On June 12, 1911, Mr. Mallette resigned. He is replaced by Jean Marie Valois, who earns $ 15.00 per month. In July 1911, Mr. Mallette is rehired at $ 300.00 per year. In 1912, his salary is $ 420.00 per year.
  • We hire also a constable, Mr. Beaton.
  • The first permanent committees set up are the Path Committee, the Water and Light Committee, and for the Finance Committee, a lawyer is a part of it.
  • The Path Committee hires an inspector of buildings, named Harold E. Shorey at a salary of $ 50.00 per year.
  • A building permit, or other, costs $ 2.00.
  • An engineer, Mr. B. Boulay, of the City and District of Montreal (the term used in the minutes) is a consultant for the City of Beaconsfield.
  • The major concern of the Council is the construction of roads.
  • We hire a man to cut the grass along different paths.
  • In 1912, Mr. Napoleon Legault was named rural inspector of the City of Beaconsfield, at a salary of $ 25.00 per year. His work is under the jurisdiction of the Path Committee, and will end on 1 October 1913.
  • In 1914, the Commissioner of the school, which takes place at City Council meetings, requires $ 60.00 per year to wash the room in question. The City offers $ 50.00.
  • A citizen of Beaconsfield made an offer to the city: a free site to build a city hall or other municipal building on Woodland Street. The Council offers their thanks.
  • An officer specially appointed by the City shall have the duty to monitor the observance of law no. 46. For non-compliance, there are 40.00 fine and costs, or a possibility of two months' imprisonment.
  • During the years of economic crisis, from 1929 to 1939, there are programs to help the unemployed. These programs are organized by the Quebec government. The work covered by the City are sidewalks, ditches, grading and repair of roads.
  • These unemployed are paid 0.20 an hour to work six days a week, six hours a day.
  • At that time, we mention the cleaning of street lamps.
  • In 1934, the City requested bids for the work of the winter road, harrow horses. For example, one man and four horses costs $ 1.25 per hour, and two men and two horses cost 0.75. These prices are the lowest bidder.
  • Another bidder asked for twice the amount.
  • These teams are at the request of City Superintendent who will have the direct supervision of the maintenance of winter roads.
  • In 1941, to clean the ice, the price was $ 3.50.
  • In 1941, it says: no City employee, paid by the hour, is considered permanent and therefore they come within the ambit of the law of unemployment insurance.
  • In 1941, Lafrance Zéphirin made application for the position of assistant superintendent, and the City responded that the position does not exist. At this time, the city decided to buy rubber gloves and safety belts for municipal employees.

**Text written by Camilla Gagnon, archivist for the City of Beaconsfield